Do You Have A Van Antwerp Story? Saturday, Nov 1 2008 

If you have a story about the family, a picture, or something you want to share about the history of the family, please let me know.  I am happy to post it and hope to make this a living site for our kids to have access to.

You can leave it as a comment or e-mail me at gvanantwerp @ mac . com.

Eugene I Van Antwerp Old Paper – Armistice Day Friday, Dec 27 2013 

A relative to recently started reading this blog sent this to me.  Thanks again.  

I thought I would share the PDF of the article here.

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Original Van Antwerps To The New World Sunday, Sep 29 2013 

 

 

Here’s a section from “A History of Van Buren County” which you can use Google books to navigate.  It’s interesting.  Here’s a passage talking about 3 brothers coming from Antwerp, Holland to Schenectady, NY in the 1700s.

 

2 Van Antwerp Wills From 1744 and 1781 Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

The Schenectady Historical Society has a list of wills that they have archived.  Two of those are from the early Van Antwerp family that lived in that area.

http://schenectadyhistorical.org/admin/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Wills_Final1.pdf

8 Van Antwerps In The Holland Society in 1902 Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

There were 8 Van Antwerps in the Holland Society in 1902.  Here’s a link to the list.

http://books.google.com/books?id=kvZSAAAAYAAJ&lpg=PA162&ots=YwoNk_BnW1&dq=%22van%20Antwerp%22&pg=PA162#v=onepage&q=%22van%20Antwerp%22&f=false

Van Antwerp’s In The Revolutionary War Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

According to this view thru Google books of people in NY that were in the Revolutionary War, this shows 12 Van Antwerps.  

The book is called New York In The Revolution As Colony And State.

http://books.google.com/books?id=u-81AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA502&lpg=PA502&dq=%22van+Antwerp%22&source=bl&ots=RP82izw6Bb&sig=tXh5tqzDy6iqzu4bho6viCXLuPA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ALtGUqnGMvL_4AOKj4Bo&ved=0CGIQ6AEwCTiMAQ#v=onepage&q=%22van%20Antwerp%22&f=false 

Mobile AL Van Antwerp Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

I’ve always wondered if the Van Antwerp building in Mobile was related to our family.  Based on the obituary here which has a Daniel Janse Van Antwerp mentioned which is a common name in our family tree, I’m going to guess that it is.

Mr. James Callanan Van Antwerp, Jr. – born September 24, 1923, a native of Mobile, AL passed away at his home on July 25, 2009. A graduate of Murphy High School, 1940, and the United States Naval Academy, 1945, Jim served his country in the United States Navy for 16 years. He returned to run the family business and he was a former Chairman of the Mobile Republican Executive Committee and the First Congressional District Committee. He was preceded in death by his parents James Callanan Van Antwerp, Sr. and Fanny Imahorn Van Antwerp. He is survived by his wife Margaret Barrett Van Antwerp, his children James Callanan Van Antwerp, III (Allison), Elizabeth Van Antwerp Reasonover (A.B.) and John David Van Antwerp (Cheryl), his brother Daniel Janse Van Antwerp, and his grandchildren Nicholas Allan Van Antwerp, Mitchell Aaron Van Antwerp, Tyler James Van Antwerp, Andrew Philip Van Antwerp, Matthew Karol Van Antwerp, Ross Michael Reasonover, and Ryan Thomas Reasonover.

My Uncle Joe Van Antwerp’s Obituary Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

Francis Joseph Van Antwerp Sr., of Cheboygan, passed away at Northern Michigan Hospital in Petoskey on Monday, Jan. 21, 2002.

“Joe” was born in Detroit on Aug. 4, 1919, the son of Eugene and Frances (McDevitt) Van Antwerp. He attended Gesu Elementary School in Detroit and later graduated from U of D High School, where he played on the City of Detroit champion football team, scoring the winning touchdown in the city championship game. He attended the University of Detroit, his education being interrupted by World War II.

He received an appointment in the U.S. Naval Academy and upon his graduation was commissioned an ensign in the U.S. Navy. Joe served in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters attaining the rank of lieutenant commander.

Joe married Elizabeth Ann Durocher of DeTour, the daughter of Ray and May Durocher, on July 29, 1941, at Gesu Church in Detroit. This union of 60 years was truly an example of lasting and devoted love.

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Following the war, Joe returned to his studies at the University of Detroit, where he graduated with a degree in civil engineering, becoming a Registered Professional Engineer in Michigan and Florida.

Joe and Ray Durocher co-founded Durocher-Van Antwerp, which later became Durocher Dock and Dredge, where he served as its president until his retirement.

He was a director of the Citizen’s National Bank from 1965 to 1990 and served as chairman of the board from 1986 to 1990.

His life-long accomplishments were many and varied beginning with achieving the rank of Eagle Scout in 1933. Following in his father’s footsteps, who was a former mayor of the city of Detroit, Joe became active in local politics serving as mayor and councilman of the city of Cheboygan. He was a Cheboygan County Supervisor and board member of the following organizations: Michigan Turnpike Authority, Cheboygan Planning Commission, Cheboygan Hospital Board, Cheboygan Housing Commission, Economic Development Commission, Mullett Lake and Cheboygan country clubs. Joe was also a life member of the Disabled American Veterans, life member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Third and Fourth Degree Knights of Columbus, founding member of the board of the Cheboygan City-County Airport, Michigan Society of Professional Engineers of which he served as president of the Petoskey chapter and former state vice president of the same.

Of all his life’s accomplishments Joe will be remembered most as a loving and devoted husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. He will be deeply missed.

Joe is survived by his loving wife, Elizabeth “Betty,” and their children, Elizabeth (David) Kalb of Bloomfield Hills, Joe (Nancy) VanAntwerp of Cheboygan, Mary (Donald) Kosorski of Cheboygan, and Kristin (Paul) Bahra of Northville; grandchildren include Sarah and Mia Sorgi, Raymond, Timothy (Erin), and Michael Van Antwerp, Meaghan (Douglas) Isard, Kristin Kosorski Davis, Katherine, Elizabeth, and Joey Kosorski, and Elizabeth and Stephen Bahra; great-grandchildren include Abigail, Claudia, and Sophie Isard.

 

Van’s Bakery Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

Van’s Bakery was a landmark in Edmond, Oklahoma for 44 years and was ranked in its day as one of the outstanding independent bakeries of Oklahoma. Many of Edmond’s citizens will remember the smell of Van’s bread baking as they walked or drove through the downtown area.

In 1889, George Van Antwerp made the Land Run of 1889 and settled just south of Oklahoma City. Everett Van Antwerp was born in 1893, 4 years after the run. 

Van’s Bakery opened in 1915 by George Van Antwerp and his brother Irvin. The building included a cafe and a confectionary. In 1920, George’s son Everett came out of service in the first world war and bought his father’s and uncle’s shares of the business and  in 1928, Everett Howard Van Antwerp moved the bakery to a location on the northeast corner of Second Street and Broadway. E.H. Van Antwerp and his uncle Irvin shared in the running the bakery and cafe after George left the business. In the early days, Van’s Cafe was a popular location in town because it served malts, shakes and sodas on the cafe side. Irvin eventually oversaw the running of the Cafe and Everett took control of the operations of the Bakery.

The Bakery was named for Everett Howard Van Antwerp, affectionately known as “Van” by his closest friends. In the beginning, bread was delivered by hand in boxes, but by 1927 a truck delivery service had been established. Bread was made by hand in the early years of the business. In its boom years, Van’s bakery was known for its wide variety of bread, lip-smacking pies and cakes. Because of local demand, “Van” hired five women to bake and decorate birthday cakes, which were the favorite of mothers and children alike.

Van’s Bakery was famous for its potato bread which was awarded the “blue ribbon for excellence of freshness, flavor, quality, uniformity, cleanliness and value by the Independent Bakers Council of America in 1950.

As years went by, independent baking companies like Van’s became less successful because grocery store chains carried their own brands. Growing conglomerates could afford the large scale equipment and staff required to create baked goods, making it difficult for companies like Van’s to meet with its rising competition.

Van’s Bakery was closed on December 4, 1965. At that time, stores in Edmond, Oklahoma City, Stillwater, Purcell, Crescent, Geary, Wellston and Bristow were forced to stop stocking Van’s Bread and Everett Van Antwerp retired at the age of 72.

 

Fun Fact: In 1960, Humpty Dumpty Grocery took Van’s bread off its shelves to sell the store’s name brand and within 30 days the store was again stocking Van’s Bread because the townspeople demanded that it be returned to store shelves.

 

Bibliography: “Van’s Bakery a Leading Edmond Concern,” Edmond Sun, June 16, 1932, “Bread Smell Sparks Memories,” Edmond SUNday, June 3, 1979, “Van’s Bakery remembered as key in Edmond,” Edmond Life & Leisure, October 14, 2004, Blue Ribbon Ad, the Daily Oklahoman, Friday, November 2, 1951, “Van’s Bakery Set to Close Doors Saturday,” Edmond Booster, December 2, 1965.

Bernie Van Antwerp Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

I don’t think I posted this before, but this is the obituary from my cousin Bernie Van Antwerp who died young a few years ago.

Former Grosse Pointe Park resident Bernie A. Van Antwerp, 43, died suddenly of heart attack Wednesday, June 4, 2008. He was living in Lake Forest, Ill. 

Mr. Van Antwerp was raised in Grosse Pointe Park and attended St. Clare of Montefalco grade school. A job transfer took the family to Ohio and Mr. Van Antwerp graduated from Walsh Jesuit High School in Stow, Ohio.

He earned his Bachelor of Science degree from The Ohio State University and his Master of Business Administration from Wayne State University.

He was employed in sales and marketing with Oracle.

Mr. Van Antwerp was an avid skier, sailboat racer, triathlete, runner and tailgater. He was an active volunteer in his community and church as a youth sports coach and member of the Knights of Columbus.

He is survived by his wife, Patti Domzalski; children, Nicholas, Michael and Eleanor; parents, Deanna and Bernard Van Antwerp of Grosse Pointe Park; parents-in-law, Bruno and Katie Domzalski of Grosse Pointe Park; sisters, Julie (Johanne) Odermann and Lynn (Karl) Ness; brothers, Christopher (Loretta) and Michael. He also is survived by his brother-in-law, Michael (Paige) Domzalski; sister-in-law, Ellen (Chris) Clark; 16 nieces and nephews; and many friends.

Van Antwerp Fishing Reel Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

Thos. H. Chubb Henshall-Van Antwerp Reel – Post Mills, VT

Thos. H. Chubb was established in 1869 and sold a wide range of quality rods and reels. He made what is perhaps the most interesting bait casting reel ever made. The flowing lines and protruding drag thumb lever and click lever make this reel highly sought by collectors today. The German sliver Henshall-Van Antwerp reel was made for only a few years and incorporates his September 27, 1887 patent. The late model Henshall Van Antwerp reels were made by Julius vom Hofe. The reel is named after two of Chubb’s friends and associates. Dr. J.A. Henshall, author of “The Book of the Black Bass,” wrote about the merits of using tackle made by Thos. Chubb. Chubb credited Dr. Wm. Van Antwerp, of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky with co-designing the reel.

 


Van Antwerp Families By State in 1920 Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

I saw this in an advertisement for Ancestry.com obviously targeted off a Google search I was doing.  Very interesting.

Virtual Wall – Capt. Van Antwerp Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

I found another military member of the family from Albany.  

Captain William Meadon Van Antwerp, Jr.

http://www.virtualwall.org/dv/VanantwerpWM01a.htm

Van Antwerp PoliSci Expert Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

I found an article about Egypt published by an Alanna Van Antwerp – http://mideast.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2013/07/02/post_soviet_lessons_for_egypt.  

Alanna C. Van Antwerp is a Ph.D. candidate in political science at the George Washington University and was a 2012 Boren Fellow in Alexandria and Cairo, Egypt. Her research was supported in part by a Travel-Research-Engagement grant from the Project on Middle East Political Science. This post is drawn from a forthcoming book chapter titled “The Electoral Model Without Elections: The Arab Uprisings of 2011 and the Color Revolutions in Comparative Perspective” with Nathan J. Brown. Follow her on Twitter: @vanantwerpa

Rich Van Antwerp – Another Relative? Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

I found Rich online at http://www.ruffalocody.com/our-team/rich-van-antwerp/.  I’ll have to reach out to him to see how he links back to the family.  

Senior Vice President
Fundraising Management Division
Cedar Rapids, IA

Rich is now in his 18th year in the development profession. For the last 14 years, Rich has applied his telephone fundraising expertise in a sales and consulting capacity. He has assisted over 75 non-profit organizations with their telephone fundraising and membership programs. In addition to his sales and consulting responsibilities, Rich also manages RuffaloCODY’s non-profit services sales staff.

Rich began his development career as a student at Gettysburg College, managing the student phonathon program and organizing his senior class gift program, which secured Annual Fund pledges from 97% of his class. After graduation, he spent a year with the Eastman Kodak Company before returning to the development field. Philanthropy Management Inc. (PMI) hired Rich as Director of Rutgers University Foundation?s $350 million Campaign for Rutgers Telefund program. After guiding the program to record productivity levels, Rich then took on responsibilities as Assistant Director of Annual Giving at Rutgers.

Rich then returned to his alma mater where he first served as Associate Director of Annual Giving before rising to Director of Annual Giving. While at Gettysburg College, Rich was responsible for overseeing all aspects of the College’s Annual Fund program. At Gettysburg College, he was also responsible for managing the Reunion Giving and Class Agent programs in addition to the Parents Fund and Orange and Blue Fund (athletics).

Rich started with RuffaloCODY in 1997. Since moving to Cedar Rapids, Rich has become active in the community. He is a member of the Eastern Iowa Chapter of AFP, the Cedar Rapids Rotary, and has served on the Board of Directors of the IMAX/Science Station, the Cedar Rapids Symphony Orchestra and Iowan Council of Camp Fire USA.

 

Van Antwerp Law Firm Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

Although I don’t see any Van Antwerps listed on their website as current lawyers, I’m guessing there must have been one here at some point.

http://www.vmje.com

VanAntwerp, Monge, Jones, Edwards & McCann, LLP is one of the largest and most historic firms based in Eastern Kentucky. Our longstanding tradition of hard work and superior legal representation has allowed us to attract some of the best attorneys throughout the state of Kentucky. Our knowledgeable and experienced team provides exceptional representation in diverse and niche legal disciplines.

Top Family History Blogs Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

Although I haven’t been great about keeping this up, it was nice to get recognized recently as #3 on this list of Top 50 Family History Blogs.

Free People Search.org Top 50 Family History Blogs

Free People Search.org

Top 50 Family History Blogs

Obituary For William Meadon Van Antwerp Jr Saturday, Sep 28 2013 

This was sent to me by a relative – Bill Van Antwerp.  It’s a biography that will accompany a picture their having commissioned at Skull & Bones to be placed at Yale.

William Meadon Van Antwerp Jr was born in Albany, NY February 27, 1937, the son of Colonel William Meadon Van Antwerp and Marian Ericson Van Antwerp.

He attended Fishburne Military School from September 1950 through graduation in May 1954.  He graduated with honors.

In the Fall of 1954 he attended Yale University, attending the NROTC and graduated as Second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps.  While attending Yale University, he was President of his Fraternity, Zeta PSI, an honor student, Editor of the school newspaper.

Upon graduation, he attending military training at Quantico, VA and was then stationed at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base on Oahu, Hawaii.

He met his wife Helen Colosimo in Hawaii and they were married in December 1960.

On his second tour in Viet Nam, Bill was killed, leaving behind his wife, Helen, and two sons, William and Bradley.

He is buried at Arlington Cemetery.

Van Antwerp Park in Detroit Sunday, Nov 6 2011 

My uncle sent me some basic information and a few pictures from this park in Detroit which is named after his father and my grandfather.

There is a four (short) block square complex in Detroit. It is bounded on the North side by Pembroke Avenue; East side by Wyoming Street; South side by St. Martins Avenue; and West side by Pinehurst Avenue.

A Detroit Public School called Bates Academy is located on the eastern half of the complex. It was built in 1981.

The playground was named after the late Mayor Eugene I. Van Antwerp (1889-1962) is located on the western half of the complex. The playground has big grassy lawns, tennis courts, children’s playscape, baseball diamond, and one football goal posts.

Video of 16th Engineers from WWI with Eugene I Van Antwerp Sunday, Oct 16 2011 

A great 52-minute video has just been made of the contribution of the 16th Engineers in WWI by a Dennis Skupinski. Eugene (Gene) was made a major.

For quick reference, the scenes with a mustached Eugene. I. Van Antwerp are into the documentary at the following times:

4:10 – observing innoculation

14:48 – on a horse, erroneously called Major Robertson

41:07 – front of line marching men

45:46 – showing then and now where the men marched

(My cousin Mike Denton also believes you might find him at the 9:03 mark in the back row, 11th from the left, in the Officers Corps picture.)

The Mabee Farm Saturday, Sep 11 2010 

The oldest house still standing in the Mohawk Valley, the Mabee Farm Historic Site was originally settled by Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen, who established it as a fur trading post to meet Native American traders before they reached Schenectady.

He received a deed for the property in 1671 from the English governor. In 1705, Van Antwerpen sold the western portion of his land to Jan Pieterse Mabee, and it was handed down through the Mabee family for 287 years!

The Mabee original structures, which were donated by descendant George E. Franchere, include the stone farmhouse, brick slaves quarters, and a frame pre-Erie Canal Inn. A family cemetary holds graves dating back to the 1700s. Replacing the barns which burnt down in the early 20th century are the 1760 Nilsen Dutch barn, which houses displays, an English barn, and several outbuildings.

Website for the farm.

The First Van Antwerp in the New World Saturday, Jul 17 2010 

Text from book – Hudson-Mohawak Genealogy.

The family name of Van Antwerp has the significance through the Dutch that the family to which this cognomen was applied resided near the wharf or the place of wharfing casting anchor or tying up the ships and in this sense also it could signify that before they took up residence in Holland or emigrated to America they came from the great seaport of Belgium Antwerp the capital of the province of the same name

The Van Antwerp Arms as used in Holland Shield D argent a trois cremailleres de sable rangees en fasce as used in Flanders Shield D or a une fleur de lis d azur au chef d herm charged de trois pals de gules celui du milieu surcharged d une ancre d argent Motto In puritate mentis I

Daniel Janse Van Antwerp was the progenitor of the family of this name in America He was the son of Jan John Van Antwerpen of Holland and was born in 1635 He came to Beverwyck Albany NY between 1656 and 1 66 1 for his name appears upon the records as being there in 1661 when he agreed to serve Adriaan Appel for one year for a recompense of thirty five beavers equal to about n2 and found He was industrious and before long was making his own way the owner of his own bouwerie and possessed of those things which go to make a farm of good proportions Shortly after the settling of Schenectady whither he removed so that he was freer to own land himself than he was allowed while within the immediate jurisdiction of Patroon Van Rensse laer he became possessed of the Third Flat on the south side of the Mohawk river about eight miles above that city and in 1706 he sold the western half of his bouwerie 63 a 79 rods to his neighbor Jan Pieterse Me bie

His village lot within the stockade or wall was on the east side of Church street next north of the present church lot and was 108 feet wide in front and 206 feet deep wood measure In 1676 when forty one years old he was one of the five magistrates

In 1701 he was made supervisor of the town Daniel Janse Van Antwerp married Maritje Maria Groot daughter of Symon Symonse

John Van Antwerp MacMurray Wednesday, Jun 16 2010 

I found a link yesterday to the John Van Antwerp MacMurray Papers along with a bio on him and his father (who married a Van Antwerp).  It’s interesting that John would have kept both his mother and father’s name.

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Biography of Junius Wilson MacMurray (1944-1898) and John Van Antwerp MacMurray (1881-1960)

Junius Wilson MacMurray was born in Missouri, the son of Irish immigrant and blacksmith John Dennison MacMurray and Eliza Wilson. At the outbreak of the Civil War he recruited a company for the Union army, which was sworn in with the 1st Missouri Volunteers and reorganized into the 1st Missoury Light Artillery. After participating with his battery in the Battle of Vicksburg he was promoted Captain in 1863. At the end of the Civil War MacMurray participated in the Powder River Indian Expedition into Wyoming and Montana (June-November 1865). He joined the regular army in 1866 and graduated from the Artillery School at Fort Monroe, Virginia in 1870.

MacMurray served as professor of military science and tactics on detail at the University of Missouri (1872-1873) and at Cornell University (1873-1875). He taught on detached service at Union College at Schenectady, New York, where he was in charge of sanitary and landscape engineering (1879-1883). While in Schenectady he was editor of A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; being Contributions toward a History of the Lower Mohawk Valley, by Jonathan Pearson et al. (1883). In the summer of 1884, while stationed at Vancouver Barracks, WA, he served as Special Inspector of Indian Affairs and spent considerable time with the Native Americans of the region and their leader and prophet Smohalla. He shared his observations about these “Dreamers” of the Columbia River Valley in a lecture at the Albany Institute, which was published in 1886.

Additional places where MacMurray was stationed include Wadsworth, NY, and Fort Barrancas, Florida, where he contracted yellow fever during an outbreak in 1897. He died in May 1898, two months after he was promoted Major. In 1873, he married to Henrietta Van Antwerp, daughter of John H. Van Antwerp of Albany, and they had three children: Edna, Ethel and John Van Antwerp MacMurray.

John Van Antwerp MacMurray was born in Schenectady, New York on October 6, 1881 and entered boarding school in 1892 before attending Princeton University (1898-1902). After a year of travel in Europe he entered Columbia Law School in 1903. In 1906 MacMurray was admitted to the New York Bar, though he also sought to secure a position within the Foreign Service. While waiting for an appointment, he studied Elizabethan drama at Princeton, and in 1907 received a master of arts degree. That same year he was appointed Secretary of Legation and Consul General at Bangkok, Siam, followed by a position as Second Secretary of the embassy in St. Petersburg (1908-1911). After a brief interlude as Assistant Chief of the Division of Information, he became Assistant Chief and then Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs at the State Department (1911-1913).

MacMurray started specializing in Far Eastern affairs with his consecutive appointments as Secretary of Legation in Peking (1913-1917), Counselor of the Embassy in Tokyo (1917-1919), and, back at the State Department, Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs (1919-1924). In 1921 he published Treaties and Agreements with and Concerning China. In the same year he served as expert assistant on Pacific and Far Eastern affairs to American Commissioners at the International Conference on the Limitation of Armament in Washington. He also was an observer for the U.S. government at the Chinese-Japanese negotiations for the settlement of the Shantung question (1921-1922). In 1924 MacMurray became Assistant Secretary of State, but one year later he was appointed Minister to China (1925-1929), a position he desired. The unstable situation in China, however, soon led to conficts between MacMurray and his superiors at the State Department. This ultimately led MacMurray to resign in 1929, when he accepted an offer to become Director of the Walter Hines Page School of International Relations at Johns Hopkins University.

Faced with the fact that he could not secure enough funding for the Walter Hines Page School MacMurray relinquished his salary and reentered the Foreign Service in 1933, though he officially retained his position until 1935. President Roosevelt appointed him as Minister to Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (1933-1936), which was followed by an ambassadorship to Turkey (1936-1942). In these years, he also served as the Assistant Chairman of the International Wheat Advisory Committee (1933-1938) and chaired the Joint Preparatory Committee on Philippine Affairs (1937-1938). His last two years before retirement were spent back at the State Department as Special Assistant to the Secretary of State (1942-1944).

MacMurray married Lois R. Goodnow in 1916 and they had three children: Joan Goodnow, Frank Goodnow, and Lois (“Bisi”) Van Antwerp MacMurray. He died at his home in Norfolk, Connecticut on September 25, 1960.

Thaine Dorin Van Antwerp Saturday, May 22 2010 

Thank you Lisa.

On Friday ,May 14 ,2010, Thaine Dorin VanAntwerp passed away after a brief illness.

He was born April 17, 1921.  He was a WWII Veteran with Honors, Merits in the 12th Armored Division under General George Patton.  He retired from Ford Motor Car Company Division.

He is survived by his wife of 62 years Anna I. Cronander-VanAntwerp, daughter Judith M. Kershner (Royal), son James Dorin  (Lisa) VanAntwerp.  Preceded in death by daughter Linda M. VanAntwerp.

Fr. Tom McDevitt Obituary Thursday, May 6 2010 

I just found this online:

The Rev. (Father) Tom McDevitt passed away May 3, 2010 at the age of 77. He was born Oct. 5, 1932, the son of Gerald and Alice McDevitt.

He was a 1950 graduate of St. Mary’s High School, Jackson. Fr. Tom was ordained on June 29, 1958 in Louvain, Belgium. After attending Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit, he completed seminary at the American College in Louvain, Belgium. In 2000, he reached Senior Priest status (priests never really retire) at St. John Student Parish, East Lansing, but continued to be active in many areas.

He was on the retreat team at St. Francis Retreat Center in DeWitt. He has been priest/chaplain and presenter at Retrouvaille weekends around the country and on the board of Retrouvaille International. 

He has continued his love of learning, teaching, and preaching the word faithfully and with love: studying at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago and elsewhere, and teaching classes. As an International Fellow of Catholic Relief Services, he has traveled to Palestine and Israel and spoken at parishes throughout Michigan and beyond on behalf of the work done by CRS.

Tom deeply loved his God, his family and friends, his fellow priests and his own life as a priest, celebrating the sacraments and ministering to the people. Prayer and meditation were staples of his life.  He liked a good game of cards or Scrabble, enjoyed bowling with the Knights of Columbus and with family and walking or riding his bike. He loved to sing, saying, “I believe everything when I sing.”

He was enthralled with nature in its many forms; birds singing, surf pounding, stars at night. He had a great spirit of adventure both spiritually and concretely. Spiritually, this led him to explore different forms of spirituality and prayer, both Eastern and Western. Concretely that spirit led him to travel to many parts of the world, including a trip around the world with priest friends. In those travels he delighted in the culture, sights, and foods of each place he went. Now he is on the greatest adventure of his life.

He was preceded in death by his parents; sister-in-law, Kay McDevitt and brother-in-law, Stas Karasek. 

He is survived by his brothers, Jerry (Shirley) and Pat (Phyllis) McDevitt; sisters, Shirley (Bill) Phillips, Mary Karasek, and Kathy McDevitt; 18 nieces and nephews; 27 great-nieces and nephews; his much loved best friends, Fr. Jake Foglio and Jean Mather and family.

A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Thursday at St. John Church and Student Center, 327 MAC, East Lansing. The visitation will be held from 2-8 p.m. Wednesday at the church with a Scripture Service at 7 p.m. and one hour prior to the Mass on Thursday. The Rite of Committal will be held at 11 a.m. Friday in St. John’s Catholic Cemetery, Jackson.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Catholic Relief Services, 228 N. Walnut St., Lansing, MI, 48933-1122 in memory of Fr. Tom McDevitt.

The family is being served by Gorsline Runciman Funeral Homes, East Lansing, Michigan. Online condolences may be made at http://www.gorslineruncimaneastlansing.com.

Fr. Tom McDevitt Dies Wednesday, May 5 2010 

One of my favorite cousins died at age 77 yesterday.  I can remember spending many summers with him and his family growing up.  He married my wife and I.  He performed the baptism on one of my children.  He’s been a very special person in my life and someone who I always enjoyed seeing. 

Fr. Tom was a longtime pastor at the St. John Student Parish in East Lansing.  I was trying to find more information on him, but I didn’t find much online.  I know he celebrated 50 years as a priest a few years ago.

50th Wedding Anniversary Saturday, Jan 31 2009 

My Uncle Danny and his wife Cecelia are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary in a few days. He is the one that has tracked and documented much of the family history.

He sent out this note to the family that I thought I would share here…

Cecelia Elizabeth and Daniel Janse Van Antwerp of Troy announce the celebration of their 50th Wedding Anniversary on February 7th. Cecelia Martin lived in Royal Oak, Michigan. They were married in her parish church at St. Dennis, where five priest-relatives presided at the Mass.

Cecelia was born in Ramapo, New York, and is the youngest of four children of Thomas Stuart and Bernice Elizabeth (Frushour) Martin. Her father was a top salesman for West Disinfectant Company. Her family traces its roots back to Scotland and Ireland. She worked in the office both at Witbeck’s Appliances and at Dingeman Incentives. Thereafter she worked in sales at the J.L. Hudson Company, Jacobson’s Department Store, Bon-Wit Teller, and, most recently, at The Poster Gallery in the Fisher Building in sales and office work.

Danny was born in Detroit, Michigan, and is the youngest of eleven children born to Eugene Ignatius and Mary Frances (Mc Devitt) Van Antwerp. His father served on the Common Council of the City of Detroit for thirty years and was Mayor of Detroit in 1948-49. The family traces its Dutch roots back to 1655 in Schenectady, New York, and its Irish roots back to 1810 in Ennis, Maherrah and Ballyclough, Ireland. Danny served as a judge for over thirty-five years. He was Presiding Judge of the former Common Pleas Court of the City of Detroit and was Chief Judge Pro Tem of the 36th District Court in Detroit. He retired from that court in 1992 and served many years thereafter as a visiting judge throughout Southeastern Michigan.

Both Cecelia and Danny love meeting with friends and relatives, walking their three dogs, traveling, cruising, reading, jigsaw puzzles, photography, computers, shopping at Eastern Market, cider mills, berry-picking, parades, festivals (espc. Strawberry, Peach, Apple, etc.), flea markets, free arts & craft shows (espc. Ann Arbor, Rochester, Pontiac, Warren, Royal Oak, Birmingham, Bloomfield, Orchard Lake, Ferndale, Troy, etc.), neighborhood outdoor concerts, and watching, photographing and videotaping their grandchildren at T-ball, soccer, cross-country, swimming, plays, musicals, birthdays, holidays, recitals, ballets, etc. They also involve themselves in volunteer work, babysitting, and raising rescue dogs. Cecelia loves solitaire and is an expert cook and flower gardener. She is an outstanding folk dancer and dance teacher (Israeli, Armenian, Romanian, etc.), as well. Danny loves bridge, genealogy (14,000 on his data base), investing (formerly), crossword puzzles, spider solitaire, writing, weekly emailing out jokes (13th year), and Bible classes. He has written one book and co-authored two others. Sorry to say, neither are good athletes nor sports lovers (except for UDM & Notre Dame).

They are the proud parents of four wonderful and God-fearing children: Ann Elizabeth [Daniel] Wyers; Catherine Denise [Matthew] Partalis; Mary Patricia [Dennis] Moylan; and Karen Marie [Michael] Heupel.

They also have six wonderful and talented grandchildren: Audrey Ann Wyers, Patrick Daniel Wyers, Dakota Edwin Holbrook, Tyler Martin Moylan, Alec Matthew Moylan, and Lydia Mary Moylan.

dan-and-cecelia-van-antwerp

Dudley Van Antwerp – Architect Saturday, Jan 31 2009 

VAN ANTWERP, DUDLEY STRICKLAND
A.I.A. – An architect, died in Montclair, New Jersey, January 17, 1934. He was born in Huntington, Indiana, August 27, 1867. He had designed over five hundred buildings, among them the Monomonock Inn in Caldwell, New Jersey and the Bayside Yacht Club, Montclair Academy and Club House, and Empire City Trotting Track in Yonkers, New York. He was made an Associate of the American Institute of Architects in 1921 and was a member of the New Jersey Society of Architects. WWAA I – 1936-37.

John Van Antwerp MacMurray Monday, Jan 5 2009 

John Van Antwerp MacMurray was born in Schenectady, New York on October 6, 1881 and entered boarding school in 1892 before attending Princeton University (1898-1902). After a year of travel in Europe he entered Columbia Law School in 1903. In 1906 he was admitted to the New York Bar. By this time MacMurray was trying to secure an appointment in the Foreign Service. While waiting for an appointment, he made a study of Elizabethan drama at Princeton. In 1907 he received a master of arts degree from his alma mater and was appointed Secretary of Legation and Consul General at Bangkok, Siam, followed by a position as Second Secretary of the embassy in St. Petersburg (1908-1911). After a brief interlude as Assistant Chief of the Division of Information, he became Assistant Chief and then Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs at the State Department (1911-1913). He started specializing in Far Eastern affairs with his consecutive appointments as Secretary of Legation in Peking (1913-1917), Counselor of the embassy in Tokyo (1917-1919), and, back at the State Department, Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs (1919-1924). In 1921 he published Treaties and Agreements with and Concerning China. In the same year he served as expert assistant on Pacific and Far Eastern affairs to American Commissioners at the International Conference on the Limitation of Armament in Washington. He also was an observer for the U.S. government at the Chinese-Japanese negotiations for the settlement of the Shantung question (1921-1922).

In 1924 MacMurray became Assistant Secretary of State, but one year later he was back in his area of specialization as Minister to China (1925-1929). In this capacity he chaired the American delegation to the Special Conference on the Chinese Customs Tariff (1925-1926). In 1930 he made a very different career choice, accepting an offer to become Director of the Walter Hines Page School of International Relations at Johns Hopkins University, a position he officially held until 1935. Faced with the fact that he could no longer secure enough funding for the School, he relinquished his salary and reentered the Foreign Service in 1933 as Minister to Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, followed by an ambassadorship to Turkey (1936-1942). In these years, he also served as the Assistant Chairman of the International Wheat Advisory Committee (1933-1938) and chaired the Joint Preparatory Committee on Philippine Affairs (1937-1938). His last two years before retirement were spent back at the State Department as Special Assistant to the Secretary of State (1942-1944).

MacMurray married Lois R. Goodnow in 1916 and had three children: Joan Goodnow, Frank Goodnow, and Lois Van Antwerp. He died at his home in Norfolk, Connecticut on September 25, 1960.

His father, Junius Wilson MacMurray, was born in Missouri, the son of Irish immigrant and blacksmith John Dennison MacMurray and Eliza Wilson. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Junius recruited a company, and as a volunteer in the Army of the Republic he rose to the rank of captain. At the close of the Civil War, he was appointed lieutenant in the First Missouri Light Artillery. He joined the regular army in 1866 and graduated from the Artillery School at Fort Monroe, Virginia in 1870. He married Henrietta Van Antwerp of Albany, New York, and by the time of John Van Antwerp’s birth in 1881, he had been a professor of military history at Cornell, lectured publicly, and was considered an authority on the history of the American Indian. He was the editor of A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; being Contributions toward a History of the Lower Mohawk Valley, by Jonathan Pearson et al. (1883).

To find more on the diplomatic papers from him, go to the Princeton library.

(Given the ties to Albany and Schenectady where the first Van Antwerps to the new world settled, I think it is pretty safe to assume he is a relative.)

Honest John McDevitt Friday, Jan 2 2009 

According to my father, this is a sketch they found with my grandfather’s initials (EIV – Eugene I Van Antwerp) of “Honest John” McDevitt who was my great grandfather.

honest-john-mcdevitt

Van Antwerp Farm – Grosse Pointe, MI Friday, Jan 2 2009 

I just got this picture of the old Van Antwerp Farm which is now at the center of Grosse Pointe, MI.

2000-van-antwerp-farm-pauline-vernier-va-gave-to-michael-va2

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