Original Van Antwerps To The New World Sunday, Sep 29 2013 

 

 

Here’s a section from “A History of Van Buren County” which you can use Google books to navigate.  It’s interesting.  Here’s a passage talking about 3 brothers coming from Antwerp, Holland to Schenectady, NY in the 1700s.

 

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Van Antwerp Park in Detroit Sunday, Nov 6 2011 

My uncle sent me some basic information and a few pictures from this park in Detroit which is named after his father and my grandfather.

There is a four (short) block square complex in Detroit. It is bounded on the North side by Pembroke Avenue; East side by Wyoming Street; South side by St. Martins Avenue; and West side by Pinehurst Avenue.

A Detroit Public School called Bates Academy is located on the eastern half of the complex. It was built in 1981.

The playground was named after the late Mayor Eugene I. Van Antwerp (1889-1962) is located on the western half of the complex. The playground has big grassy lawns, tennis courts, children’s playscape, baseball diamond, and one football goal posts.

The Mabee Farm Saturday, Sep 11 2010 

The oldest house still standing in the Mohawk Valley, the Mabee Farm Historic Site was originally settled by Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen, who established it as a fur trading post to meet Native American traders before they reached Schenectady.

He received a deed for the property in 1671 from the English governor. In 1705, Van Antwerpen sold the western portion of his land to Jan Pieterse Mabee, and it was handed down through the Mabee family for 287 years!

The Mabee original structures, which were donated by descendant George E. Franchere, include the stone farmhouse, brick slaves quarters, and a frame pre-Erie Canal Inn. A family cemetary holds graves dating back to the 1700s. Replacing the barns which burnt down in the early 20th century are the 1760 Nilsen Dutch barn, which houses displays, an English barn, and several outbuildings.

Website for the farm.

The First Van Antwerp in the New World Saturday, Jul 17 2010 

Text from book – Hudson-Mohawak Genealogy.

The family name of Van Antwerp has the significance through the Dutch that the family to which this cognomen was applied resided near the wharf or the place of wharfing casting anchor or tying up the ships and in this sense also it could signify that before they took up residence in Holland or emigrated to America they came from the great seaport of Belgium Antwerp the capital of the province of the same name

The Van Antwerp Arms as used in Holland Shield D argent a trois cremailleres de sable rangees en fasce as used in Flanders Shield D or a une fleur de lis d azur au chef d herm charged de trois pals de gules celui du milieu surcharged d une ancre d argent Motto In puritate mentis I

Daniel Janse Van Antwerp was the progenitor of the family of this name in America He was the son of Jan John Van Antwerpen of Holland and was born in 1635 He came to Beverwyck Albany NY between 1656 and 1 66 1 for his name appears upon the records as being there in 1661 when he agreed to serve Adriaan Appel for one year for a recompense of thirty five beavers equal to about n2 and found He was industrious and before long was making his own way the owner of his own bouwerie and possessed of those things which go to make a farm of good proportions Shortly after the settling of Schenectady whither he removed so that he was freer to own land himself than he was allowed while within the immediate jurisdiction of Patroon Van Rensse laer he became possessed of the Third Flat on the south side of the Mohawk river about eight miles above that city and in 1706 he sold the western half of his bouwerie 63 a 79 rods to his neighbor Jan Pieterse Me bie

His village lot within the stockade or wall was on the east side of Church street next north of the present church lot and was 108 feet wide in front and 206 feet deep wood measure In 1676 when forty one years old he was one of the five magistrates

In 1701 he was made supervisor of the town Daniel Janse Van Antwerp married Maritje Maria Groot daughter of Symon Symonse

John Van Antwerp MacMurray Wednesday, Jun 16 2010 

I found a link yesterday to the John Van Antwerp MacMurray Papers along with a bio on him and his father (who married a Van Antwerp).  It’s interesting that John would have kept both his mother and father’s name.

******

Biography of Junius Wilson MacMurray (1944-1898) and John Van Antwerp MacMurray (1881-1960)

Junius Wilson MacMurray was born in Missouri, the son of Irish immigrant and blacksmith John Dennison MacMurray and Eliza Wilson. At the outbreak of the Civil War he recruited a company for the Union army, which was sworn in with the 1st Missouri Volunteers and reorganized into the 1st Missoury Light Artillery. After participating with his battery in the Battle of Vicksburg he was promoted Captain in 1863. At the end of the Civil War MacMurray participated in the Powder River Indian Expedition into Wyoming and Montana (June-November 1865). He joined the regular army in 1866 and graduated from the Artillery School at Fort Monroe, Virginia in 1870.

MacMurray served as professor of military science and tactics on detail at the University of Missouri (1872-1873) and at Cornell University (1873-1875). He taught on detached service at Union College at Schenectady, New York, where he was in charge of sanitary and landscape engineering (1879-1883). While in Schenectady he was editor of A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; being Contributions toward a History of the Lower Mohawk Valley, by Jonathan Pearson et al. (1883). In the summer of 1884, while stationed at Vancouver Barracks, WA, he served as Special Inspector of Indian Affairs and spent considerable time with the Native Americans of the region and their leader and prophet Smohalla. He shared his observations about these “Dreamers” of the Columbia River Valley in a lecture at the Albany Institute, which was published in 1886.

Additional places where MacMurray was stationed include Wadsworth, NY, and Fort Barrancas, Florida, where he contracted yellow fever during an outbreak in 1897. He died in May 1898, two months after he was promoted Major. In 1873, he married to Henrietta Van Antwerp, daughter of John H. Van Antwerp of Albany, and they had three children: Edna, Ethel and John Van Antwerp MacMurray.

John Van Antwerp MacMurray was born in Schenectady, New York on October 6, 1881 and entered boarding school in 1892 before attending Princeton University (1898-1902). After a year of travel in Europe he entered Columbia Law School in 1903. In 1906 MacMurray was admitted to the New York Bar, though he also sought to secure a position within the Foreign Service. While waiting for an appointment, he studied Elizabethan drama at Princeton, and in 1907 received a master of arts degree. That same year he was appointed Secretary of Legation and Consul General at Bangkok, Siam, followed by a position as Second Secretary of the embassy in St. Petersburg (1908-1911). After a brief interlude as Assistant Chief of the Division of Information, he became Assistant Chief and then Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs at the State Department (1911-1913).

MacMurray started specializing in Far Eastern affairs with his consecutive appointments as Secretary of Legation in Peking (1913-1917), Counselor of the Embassy in Tokyo (1917-1919), and, back at the State Department, Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs (1919-1924). In 1921 he published Treaties and Agreements with and Concerning China. In the same year he served as expert assistant on Pacific and Far Eastern affairs to American Commissioners at the International Conference on the Limitation of Armament in Washington. He also was an observer for the U.S. government at the Chinese-Japanese negotiations for the settlement of the Shantung question (1921-1922). In 1924 MacMurray became Assistant Secretary of State, but one year later he was appointed Minister to China (1925-1929), a position he desired. The unstable situation in China, however, soon led to conficts between MacMurray and his superiors at the State Department. This ultimately led MacMurray to resign in 1929, when he accepted an offer to become Director of the Walter Hines Page School of International Relations at Johns Hopkins University.

Faced with the fact that he could not secure enough funding for the Walter Hines Page School MacMurray relinquished his salary and reentered the Foreign Service in 1933, though he officially retained his position until 1935. President Roosevelt appointed him as Minister to Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania (1933-1936), which was followed by an ambassadorship to Turkey (1936-1942). In these years, he also served as the Assistant Chairman of the International Wheat Advisory Committee (1933-1938) and chaired the Joint Preparatory Committee on Philippine Affairs (1937-1938). His last two years before retirement were spent back at the State Department as Special Assistant to the Secretary of State (1942-1944).

MacMurray married Lois R. Goodnow in 1916 and they had three children: Joan Goodnow, Frank Goodnow, and Lois (“Bisi”) Van Antwerp MacMurray. He died at his home in Norfolk, Connecticut on September 25, 1960.

John Van Antwerp MacMurray Monday, Jan 5 2009 

John Van Antwerp MacMurray was born in Schenectady, New York on October 6, 1881 and entered boarding school in 1892 before attending Princeton University (1898-1902). After a year of travel in Europe he entered Columbia Law School in 1903. In 1906 he was admitted to the New York Bar. By this time MacMurray was trying to secure an appointment in the Foreign Service. While waiting for an appointment, he made a study of Elizabethan drama at Princeton. In 1907 he received a master of arts degree from his alma mater and was appointed Secretary of Legation and Consul General at Bangkok, Siam, followed by a position as Second Secretary of the embassy in St. Petersburg (1908-1911). After a brief interlude as Assistant Chief of the Division of Information, he became Assistant Chief and then Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs at the State Department (1911-1913). He started specializing in Far Eastern affairs with his consecutive appointments as Secretary of Legation in Peking (1913-1917), Counselor of the embassy in Tokyo (1917-1919), and, back at the State Department, Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs (1919-1924). In 1921 he published Treaties and Agreements with and Concerning China. In the same year he served as expert assistant on Pacific and Far Eastern affairs to American Commissioners at the International Conference on the Limitation of Armament in Washington. He also was an observer for the U.S. government at the Chinese-Japanese negotiations for the settlement of the Shantung question (1921-1922).

In 1924 MacMurray became Assistant Secretary of State, but one year later he was back in his area of specialization as Minister to China (1925-1929). In this capacity he chaired the American delegation to the Special Conference on the Chinese Customs Tariff (1925-1926). In 1930 he made a very different career choice, accepting an offer to become Director of the Walter Hines Page School of International Relations at Johns Hopkins University, a position he officially held until 1935. Faced with the fact that he could no longer secure enough funding for the School, he relinquished his salary and reentered the Foreign Service in 1933 as Minister to Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, followed by an ambassadorship to Turkey (1936-1942). In these years, he also served as the Assistant Chairman of the International Wheat Advisory Committee (1933-1938) and chaired the Joint Preparatory Committee on Philippine Affairs (1937-1938). His last two years before retirement were spent back at the State Department as Special Assistant to the Secretary of State (1942-1944).

MacMurray married Lois R. Goodnow in 1916 and had three children: Joan Goodnow, Frank Goodnow, and Lois Van Antwerp. He died at his home in Norfolk, Connecticut on September 25, 1960.

His father, Junius Wilson MacMurray, was born in Missouri, the son of Irish immigrant and blacksmith John Dennison MacMurray and Eliza Wilson. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Junius recruited a company, and as a volunteer in the Army of the Republic he rose to the rank of captain. At the close of the Civil War, he was appointed lieutenant in the First Missouri Light Artillery. He joined the regular army in 1866 and graduated from the Artillery School at Fort Monroe, Virginia in 1870. He married Henrietta Van Antwerp of Albany, New York, and by the time of John Van Antwerp’s birth in 1881, he had been a professor of military history at Cornell, lectured publicly, and was considered an authority on the history of the American Indian. He was the editor of A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; being Contributions toward a History of the Lower Mohawk Valley, by Jonathan Pearson et al. (1883).

To find more on the diplomatic papers from him, go to the Princeton library.

(Given the ties to Albany and Schenectady where the first Van Antwerps to the new world settled, I think it is pretty safe to assume he is a relative.)

Van Antwerp Farm – Grosse Pointe, MI Friday, Jan 2 2009 

I just got this picture of the old Van Antwerp Farm which is now at the center of Grosse Pointe, MI.

2000-van-antwerp-farm-pauline-vernier-va-gave-to-michael-va2

William C. Van Antwerp Addresses Commonwealth Club 1929 Saturday, Nov 1 2008 

Interestingly, I found this posted on a financial blog.  I don’t know William’s relation to the family but given the original family resided in NY, I think it’s a safe assumption he’s related.

This is from one of the earliest Commonwealth Club speeches reacting to the stock market crash of 1929. Titled “The Panic of 1929,” the December 6, 1929, speech by William C. Van Antwerp of E.F. Hutton, offered some initial reaction to the market panic and included some surprisingly thought-provoking ruminations on the human spirit.

Here are some excerpts from Mr. Van Antwerp’s speech:

A panic is a state of mind in which fear supplants reason. It cannot be stopped by statute law or arrested by the police. The best that can be said of such a phenomenon is that it doesn’t occur very often.

In the panic of 1907, there were fundamental conditions that were not sound — in 1929, we merely suffered a case of nerves following a debauch. It is not to be expected that sound and conservative industry will be shaken this time.

This present panic had its roots back in 1917, when our masses found that they could invest money in bits of paper called Liberty Bonds. From investing to speculating was an easy step.

Whether it be public excess, saxaphones or modern art, the American public always goes too far. If we emerge from our excesses somewhat sadly, we are also somewhat wiser.

The stock market was running wide open and good judgment was forgotten. Most of the post-mortem warnings we now hear about were never given until after the panic occurred.

The recent rise had to stop in one way if it did not in another. Even a billion dollar pool would not have averted the panic.

We have for some time been “rotten rich” — now for a short time we are to be merely “affluent.”

President Hoover will bring into action the confidence reserves which everybody knows we possess. When we start forward again as we surely shall, trade and prosperity will go forward to heights not now imagined.

Linking Detroit back to NY Sunday, Nov 25 2007 

Continuing on Rootsweb, it looks like the Van Antwerp family moved to Detroit back in the early 1800s with Francis Van Antwerp and that his only child to have decendents was Eugene Charles.

  • Name: Francis Joseph VAN ANTWERP
  • Birth: 8 Apr 1831 in Detroit, Michigan
  • Death: 28 Jun 1892 in Detroit, Michigan
  • Father: Francis VAN ANTWERP b: 4 Oct 1804 in Amsterdam, New York
    Mother: Appoline dit La Douceur VERNIER b: 19 Feb 1810 in Detroit, Michigan

    Marriage 1 Mary Eliza GORE b: 4 Sep 1825 in Deer Park, Ennis, County Clare, Ireland

    • Married: 1 Feb 1855 in Detroit, Michigan
    • Fact 2: 1 Feb 1855 in byFr.Hennaert,V.G., in Sts.Peter&Paul Cathedral.

    Children

    1. Eugene Charles VAN ANTWERP b: 22 Nov 1855 in Detroit, Michigan
    2. Francis Selah Joseph VAN ANTWERP b: 22 Apr 1858 in Detroit, Michigan (pastor of Holy Rosary Church in Detroit, MI; Vicar General of Detroit Diocese; Monsignor, Catholic Diocese of Detroit)
    3. Arthur Patrick VAN ANTWERP b: 3 Jul 1860 in Detroit, Michigan (Jesuit priest who died at age 35 after getting run over by a train in St. Louis, MO)
    4. Michael Gore VAN ANTWERP b: 4 Sep 1863 in Detroit, Michigan (married Elizabeth Brodel; never had children; operated the Van Antwerp Coal Co.)
    5. Pauline Mary VAN ANTWERP , R.S.C.J. b: 12 May 1866 in Detroit, Michigan (sister in the Religious of the Sacred Heart stationed in Grosse Pointe, MI)
    6. Mary Ann Eliza VAN ANTWERP b: 11 Jun 1868 in Detroit, Michigan (married and had two children – one was a priest and the other died in his early 20s)

    Great, Great Grandfather Sunday, Nov 25 2007 

    Now this seems to get to the multiple trees in the Michigan area. 

    Eugene Charles VAN ANTWERP

  • Birth: 22 Nov 1855 in Detroit, Michigan
  • Death: 10 Jan 1912 in Detroit, Michigan

    Father: Francis Joseph VAN ANTWERP b: 8 Apr 1831 in Detroit, Michigan
    Mother:
    Mary Eliza GORE b: 4 Sep 1825 in Deer Park, Ennis, County Clare, Ireland

    Marriage 1 Cecilia Mary RENO b: 21 Sep 1859 in Detroit, Michigan

    • Married: 25 Nov 1884 in Detroit, Michigan
    • Fact 2: in at Sts.Peter & Paul (Jesuit) Cathedral.

    Children

    1. Mary Cecilia VAN ANTWERP b: 21 Sep 1885 in Detroit, Michigan
    2. Francis Frieden VAN ANTWERP b: 24 Aug 1887 in Detroit, Michigan
    3. Eugene Ignatius VAN ANTWERP , Sr. b: 26 Jul 1889 in Detroit, Michigan
    4. Arthur Joseph VAN ANTWERP , Sr. b: 5 Sep 1891 in Detroit, Michigan
    5. Virginie Agnes VAN ANTWERP b: 8 Mar 1894 in Detroit, Michigan
    6. Thomas Joseph VAN ANTWERP , Sr. b: 20 Jun 1895 in Detroit, Michigan
    7. Anna Marie Pauline VAN ANTWERP b: 31 Jan 1897 in Detroit, Michigan
    8. George Louis Reno VAN ANTWERP I b: 27 Jan 1898 in Detroit, Michigan
    9. Cecilia Mary Elizabeth VAN ANTWERP b: 6 Apr 1899 in Detroit, Michigan
    10. Agnes Mary Martha VAN ANTWERP b: 8 Feb 1906 in Detroit, Michigan
  • Going Back One More Generation Sunday, Nov 25 2007 

    So, yesterday I posted my generation and my father’s generation.  Now, let me go back to my great-grandfather.  From Rootsweb, it tells me:

  • Name: Eugene Charles VAN ANTWERP
  • Birth: 11 – 22 – 1855 in Detroit , Michigan
  • Death: 1 – 10 – 1912 in Detroit , MichiganFather: Francis Joseph VAN ANTWERP b: 4 – 8 – 1831 in Detroit , Michigan
    Mother: Mary Eliza GORE b: 9 – 4 – 1825 in Ireland

    Marriage 1 Cecilia Mary RENO b: 9 – 21 – 1859 in Detroit , Michigan

    • Married: 11 – 25 – 1884 in Detroit , Michigan

    Children

    1. Has No Children Mary Cecilia VAN ANTWERP b: 9 – 21 – 1885 in Detroit , Michigan
    2. Has No Children Eugene Ignatius VAN ANTWERP b: 7 – 26 – 1889 in Detroit , Michigan
  • Clicking through on my grandfather’s sister doesn’t reveal much other than she died in St. Louis.

  • Name: Mary Cecilia VAN ANTWERP
  • Birth: 9 – 21 – 1885 in Detroit , Michigan
  • Death: 1 – 1 – 1959 in St. Louis , Missouri
  • Family Notes from “The Final Four” Sunday, Nov 25 2007 

    The remaining four brothers and sisters that are decendants of Eugene I Van Antwerp wrote a book called “The Final Four: Van Antwerp Family Profiles” which just came out. It was written by Agnes, George, Dacia, and Daniel. Here are some things from it.

    It is amazing to me that they had as many as 15 people living in a five bedroom house Detroit (16845 Muirland Avenue). There were 11 kids plus parents plus their Aunt Mamie (Bourke) [mother’s maiden aunt] and some friend of their dad’s from WWI that lived in the basement.

    Parents: Eugene Ignatius Van Antwerp (7/26/89) and Mary Frances McDevitt (8/17/90)

    Kids: Polly, Lauretta, Joan, Gene, Joe, Dolores, Gore, Agnes, Dacia, George, and Danny

    [Eugene I was the son of Eugene Charles Van Antwerp and Cecelia Renaud (aka Reno)]

    [Mary Francis McDevitt was the daughter of John J. McDevitt and Caroline Bourke]

    I never met either of my grandparents on this side and only one on my mother’s side. [My mother (Mary Louise Beale) married George Van Antwerp and her father was the first generation here in the US. I have only heard a little about the family history which was traced back to William of Orange.]

    Pauline Annetta Van Antwerp married Robert William Denton
    * Mary Dolores Denton (married Cyril DeMeulemeester)

    – Kathleen Marie DeMeulemeester (married David J Bredenberg)
        – Jacqueline Monique Bredenberg
    – Robert Sean DeMeulemeester (married Kathleen Keiko Kamatani)
        – Cole Mansfield DeMeulemeester
    – Scott Denton Andrew DeMeulemeester (married Monica)
        – Morgan Elizabeth DeMeulemeester
        – Matthew DeMeulemeester
        – Jack DeMeulemeester
    – Laura Monique DeMeulemeester

    * Kathleen Clare Denton (married Michael Buell Doelle)
    * Robert William Denton II (married Barbara Oblin)

    – Ann Marie Denton (married James Westerberg)
        – Andrew J. Denton
        – Robert William Denton III
    – Tracie Michelle Denton (married Stephen Lawrence Kelly)
        – Spencer Stephen Kelly
    – (2nd wife of Robert William II was Patricia Garrisi)
    – (3rd wife of Robert William II was Margaret Joan Helm)
    – Joan Denton
    – Sarah Denton (married Senor Sentell)

    * Caroline Joan Denton (married William Ryan Wundrach)

    – Maria Ann Wundrach (married Michael E. Butler)
        – Michael Jason Butler
        – Matthew Butler
    – Christopher William Wundrach (married Suzette Oztrowski)
        – Dean Christopher Wundrach
    – Patrick Thomas Wundrach (married Kathleen)

    * Philip Eugene Denton (married Nancy Thierry)

    – Kaitlin Marie Denton

    * Richard Michael Denton (married Mary Patricia Schaeffner)

    – Brian Michael Denton
    – Timothy Patrick Denton

    * John Patrick Denton (married Patricia Ver Vane)

    – Adeana Marie Denton (married Kelly Peters)
        – Ethan Peters
    – Amy Elizabeth Denton (married Jason Jacob Swackhamer)
    – Shane Patrick Denton

    * Colleen Elizabeth Denton (married William Joseph Schechter)
    – (2nd husband Ray Taylor)

    Frances Lauretta Van Antwerp married Julius Aloysius Jaeger
    * Julius Patrick Jaeger (married Sandi Allen)

    – Nina Leigh Jaeger (married David Shorum)
        – Mitchell Shorum
        – Morgan Shorum
    – Lisa Marie Jaeger (married Brett Tilley)
        – Lauren Tilley
        – Olivia Tilley
        – Cole Tilley
    – Trisha Jaeger (married Graham)
        – Graham
        – Audrey Graham
    – Michael Jaeger

    * Eugene Michael Jaeger (married Elaine)
    * Peter Anthony Jaeger (married Linda Smith)

    – Christina Marie Jaeger
    – (2nd wife Kathleen A Weissenborn)
    – Dawn Michelle Jaeger
    – Timothy Peter Jaeger (married Nicole)

    * Juanita Appolene Jaeger (married John Conrad Muehlbauer)

    – Cynthia Marie Muehlbauer (married Marc Arthur Cabral)
    – John Julius Muehlbauer (married Daphne Dianne Holcombe)
    – Lauretta Ann Muehlbauer (married Jefferson Cohan)

    * Daniel Gore Jaeger (married Jane Denton Bradshaw)

    – Raegan Jaeger
    – Natasha Jaeger

    * Mary Josepha Jaeger (married Gordon Jafes Wysong)

    – Brian J. Wysong
    – David J. Wysong

    * Frances Lauretta Jaeger (married John Francis Jerow)

    – John Gordon Jerow (married Janna Manes)

    * Stephan Paul Jaeger (married Kay)

    – Patrick Jaeger
    – Carrie Ann Jaeger

    * William Henry Jaeger
    * Bridget Kunigunde Jaeger (married Robert L. Cady)
    * Matha Sabina Jaeger (married Peter Klaase)

    – Tenneya Klaase (married Sergei)
    – Raymond Klaase

    Francis Joseph Van Antwerp, Sr. married Elizabeth Ann Durocher (Betty)
    * Elizabeth Ann Van Antwerp (married Michael Louis Sorgi)

    – Sarah Elizabeth Sorgi
    – Mia Catherine Sorgi
    – (2nd husband – David Arthur Kalb)

    * Francis Joseph Van Antwerp, Jr. (married Nancy Ann Lawler)

    – Raymond Champion Van Antwerp (married Holly Ellis)
        – Meaghan Beth Van Antwerp
    – Timothy James Van Antwerp (married Erin)
    – Michael Ambrose Van Antwerp (married Iwona Ryszkowska)

    * Daniel Janse Van Antwerp (RIP)
    * Mary Catherine Van Antwerp (married Donald John Kozorski II)

    – Kristin May Kosorski (married Chad Wells Davis)
    – (2nd husband – Brad Haase)
        – Sara May Haase
    – Katherine Mary Kosorski
    – Elizabeth Ann Kosorski
    – Francis Joseph Kosorski

    * Kristin Jane Van Antwerp (married Paul Stephen Bahra, Sr.)

    – Elizabeth Ann Bahra
    – Paul Stephen Bahra, Jr.

    Anthony Gore Van Antwerp (married Colette Ann Rothmeyer)
    * Rosemary Dirkie Van Antwerp (married Peter J. Zacchilli)

    – Michaela C. Zacchilli

    * Francis Ann Van Antwerp (married Eric Nygaard)
    * John Van Antwerp (RIP)
    * Mary Elizabeth Van Antwerp
    * (2nd wife – Betsy)
    * (3rd wife – Sylvia Holmes)

    Joan Cecilia Van Antwerp (married John Francis Shannon II)
    * John Francis Shannon III (married Alyn Carpenter)

    – Lindsay Shannon (married Philip Davidson)
        – Gracie Davidson
        – William Davidson
    – John Francis Shannon IV (married)
        – Devin Shannon

    * Michael Shannon (RIP)
    * Patrick Shannon (RIP)
    * Kathleen Elizabeth Shannon (married Norman Robert Bean)
    * Dacia Joan Shannon (married William Michael Burke, Jr.)

    – Denis Robert Burke (married Amy Lynne Garey)
        – Aubrey Michelle Burke
    – Michael Shannon Burke

    * Mary Pauline Anna Shannon (married Louis Patrick Smith)

    – Joshua Louis Smith
    – Ashley Shannon Smith

    * Frances Caroline Shannon (married Walter Francis Akstull II)

    – Walter Frances Akstull III
    – Tara Shannon Akstull

    * Eugene Charles Shannon
    * Cynthia Georgianne Shannon (married Eric Haegele)

    – Shannon Michaela Haegele
    – Dacia Joan Haegele (marrie Jared Cahill)
    – Jack Rolf Cahill

    * George Van Antwerp Shannon, Sr. (married Heather O’Connor)

    – Ciaran Shannon
    – Siobhan Mary Shannon
    – (2nd wife – Dawn Wimberly)
    – George Van Antwerp Shannon, Jr.
    – Colleen Shannon

    * Kevin Joseph Shannon (married Carolyn Underhill)

    – Molly Frances Shannon
    – John Patrick Shannon

    * Kelly Ann Shannon (married Derek Schwartzenburg)
    * (2nd husband – John Langford De Lee)
    * (3rd husband – Philip Aloysius Jacobs)

    George Bernard Van Antwerp, Sr. (married Mary Louis Beale)
    * George Bernard Van Antwerp, Jr. (married Kerri Anne Kelly)

    – Keeley Anne Van Antwerp
    – Britt Aaron Van Antwerp

    * Karon Ann Van Antwerp (married Andrew Latham)

    – Alex James Latham

    * Michael Gerald Van Antwerp (married Ami Marie Field)

    – Sawyer Janse Van Antwerp
    – Macie Kathleen Van Antwerp

    Rita Dacia Van Antwerp (married Reginald James McLaren)
    * Kevin McLaren (stepson)
    * (after Pauline (Polly) died and Reg died – Dacia married Robert W. Denton who was her sister Polly’s husband)

    Daniel Janse Van Antwerp (married Cecelia Elizabeth Martin)
    * Ann Elizabeth Van Antwerp (married Daniel David Wyers)

    – Audrey Ann Wyers
    – Patrick Daniel Wyers
    – Dakota Edwin Holbrook

    * Catherine Denise Van Antwerp (married Matthew Christopher Partalis)
    * Mary Patricia Van Antwerp (married Dennis Patrick Moylan)

    – Tyler Martin Moylan
    – Alec Matthew Moylan
    – Lydia Marie Moylan

    * Karen Marie Van Antwerp (married Michael Heupel)

    Good timing Tuesday, Nov 20 2007 

    Last night, I received a new book from my dad titled “The Final Four” which is from the four living brothers and sisters talking about the 11 kids.  This provides some good fodder for the blog including a good detailed list of cousins.

    It also reminded me that I should go dig through “Zoon: Van Antwerp Family Saga” which is another book that my dad and uncle put out.  I guess it is a fictional history book which sticks generally to the history from Holland until modern times, but they take some liberties with the details. 

    [After my father retired, he began publishing books about people, the family, his life, and other topics.] 

    I don’t know if he has extras, but let me know if you’re interested.  Amazon and others sometimes list the books, but he didn’t do a big run.

    Aunts and Uncles back in 1923 Sunday, Nov 11 2007 

    Here is a picture of some of my aunts and uncles from 1923 Detroit.  It is Lauretta, Dolores, Gene, Joe, and Polly Van Antwerp.  I think the goat was named Misha.

    vanantwerp_s-laurettadoloresgenejoepollygoatmisha1923detroitmi.jpg

    Mayor Eugene I Van Antwerp Sunday, Nov 11 2007 

    Here are a few old pictures I had on Eugene (my grandfather) which show him with President’s Kennedy and Truman.  I know Truman is from 1948.  I am sure Kennedy is from a similar time.

    presidentkennedy_genevanantwerp.jpgpresidenttruman_mayoreugeneivanantwerpdetroitmi-1948.jpg

    Major Van Antwerp Wednesday, Nov 7 2007 

    Here is a story about a Major Van Antwerp and the battle of Cane Hill, AK in 1862.

    Sotherby’s Sale of Van Antwerp Library Wednesday, Nov 7 2007 

    Just an interesting blurb about selling William Van Antwerp of NY’s books in 1907.

    Box of Van Antwerp momentos Saturday, Nov 3 2007 

    I found this list of contents in Albany of Van Antwerp momentos.

    Van Antwerp: The first Van Antwerp in the New World was Daniel Janse Van
    Antwerpen, who was in Beverwyck by 1656. The family thrived in Albany and
    Schenectady until the early 20th c. The patriarch of the family from which these papers
    came was John Henry Van Antwerp (1823-1903). He was a founder and the second
    President of the National Savings Bank, serving as President from May 1872 to Jan 1901.
    He was one of the originators of the idea of Washington Park in Albany and served as the
    President of the Board for its first 13 years.

    Van Antwerp family: 3 folders – business and social papers, personal correspondence, and materials related to a daughter (Kate) and her family group (Stanton). Easton family: 3 folders – family papers from 1816 to 1900, legal documents from Edward Easton, Jr., and letters from Lt. Col John VA Easton about his military service in Germany 1944-5. Boyd family folder. One folder of photos of Van Antwerp relatives. One folder of photos of Easton relatives. Folder 10 contains an inventory of the Van Der Bogert manuscript box in the New York State Museum Archives Collection: contents are mostly Easton and Van Antwerp papers.

    First Van Antwerp in the US Saturday, Nov 3 2007 

    Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen
    b. c 1635, d. a 1720
    Pedigree

    Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen was the son of Jan of Antwerp and Neeltje ?. He was born circa 1635 at Antwerp, Netherlands. He married Maria Groot, daughter of Symon Symonse Groot and Rebecca du Trieux, circa 1669 at Schenectady, NY. He died after 1720.
    Daniel was a deputy shout fiscal in Albany in 1656. He signed a contract to serve Adriaan Appel, an innkeeper, for one year 24 Sept 1661. He then went to Delaware, returning to the Hudson Valley about 1665. He settled at 8 miles north of Schenectady about 1670. Daniel was a magistrate in Schenectady in 1676, in 1704 a member of the Board of Trustees, deacon in 1703 and probably elder in 1715. That year he deeded part of a lot to the Reformed Church.
         Children of Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen and Maria Groot:
    Jan Danielse Van Antwerp+   (24 Nov 1670 – 26 Jan 1756)
    Arent Danielse Van Antwerp+   (c 1684)
    Simon Danielse Van Antwerp   (c 1685 – c 1747)
    Daniel Danielse Van Antwerp   (c 1686 – b 1746)
    Pieter Danielse Van Antwerp   (c 1688 – a 1742)
    Neeltje Danielse Van Antwerp   (07 Jul 1690)
    Rebecca Danielse Van Antwerp   (25 Dec 1692 – 1765)
    Maria Danielse Van Antwerp   (03 Jan 1694/95)
     

    SOURCE 

    Mount Vernon Saturday, Nov 3 2007 

    1858-1870, Mrs. VerPlanck Van Antwerp

    Jane Maria Yates (1815-1870), daughter of John Van Ness Yates, of Albany, and granddaughter of Robert Yates, member of the Constitutional Convention of 1787. She married General Verplanck Van Antwerp, also of Albany. He took an active part in Indian affairs, and settled at Keokuk, Iowa, about the year 1840. During the Civil War he was distinguished for gallantry in the Missouri and Arkansas campaigns. Mrs. Van Antwerp engaged in a most active campaign for Mount Vernon, issuing a number of appeals to the people of Iowa. She was the seventeenth Vice Regent to be appointed and was one of the small but faithful group who received the Regent at the 1866 meeting and helped her to resume the great work that had begun before the war. Mrs. Van Antwerp served until her death.

    From Catalogue of the Centennial Exhibition Commemorating the Founding of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union, 1853-1953 , Mount Vernon, Va. : 1953.

    (Source)

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    First Ferris State Class – Lutie Van Antwerp Saturday, Nov 3 2007 

    big-rapids-class.jpg

    No one can match the names with the faces, but the names of this first Big Rapids Industrial School class of 15, including W.N. Ferris (backrow, middle) are Taylor M. Brown, Dee W. Brown, Miss Chappell, Nelia Castle, Lin Reynolds, Bruce Heling, Elmer Selinger, Fred Wilcox, Charlie Barstow, Tom Whelpy, Fred Ladner, Buff Ladner, Lutie VanAntwerp, Emma Judkins, and H.C. Ward. (Source)

    Brevet General – Civil War Saturday, Nov 3 2007 

    Van Antwerp, Verplanck – Maj., Additional Aide-de-Camp, U.S.V.
    Brevet Brig. Gen. U.S.V. February 13 1865

    MAJOR ISAAC VERPLANCK VAN ANTWERP
    Acting Assistant Adjutant General

    Born:           June 8, 1807, Coeymans, Albany County, New York
    Died:           December 2, 1875, near Upper Marlboro, Maryland
    Education:   United States Military Academy
    Occupation: Lawyer, politician, and U.S. Land Office Receiver for Iowa before war.
    Regular Army after war.
    Buried:        Trinity Episcopal Churchyard, Upper Marlboro, Maryland (Unmarked).

    (source)

    A brevet rank was an honorary promotion given to an officer (or occasionally, an enlisted man) in recognition of gallant conduct or other meritorious service. They served much the same purpose that medals play today (our modern system of medals did not exist at the time of the Civil War).

    (Source)

    brevet-general-va.jpg

    Van Antwerp Records Wednesday, Oct 31 2007 

    Looking up Van Antwerp on last-names.net yields the following.  Which I guess begs the question of whether all Van Antwerps in the US are related or was this a general name?

    When I have more time, I will go in and look some of these references up.

    van-antwerps.png

    Van Antwerp Pharmacy Sunday, Oct 28 2007 

    va-pharmacy.png

    I found a nice picture of a Van Antwerp pharmacy in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

    Msqr. Francis Van Antwerp (Detroit) Sunday, Oct 28 2007 

    A story about the Dominicoan Nuns coming to Detroit and a Msqr. Francis Van Antwerp (picture below).

    msqr-van.jpg

    Dr. Van Antwerp – old pictures Saturday, Oct 27 2007 

    I found several old pictures that refer to a Dr. Van Antwerp’s Summer Home near Cave Run Lake, KY.  I don’t know anything about who this is, but thought someone might be interested or know the link.

    Mentions in Books Saturday, Oct 27 2007 

    Project Gutenberg allowed me to search some published books for “van antwerp”.  Here are a few mentions I found.

    … arrived in New York City, the Valencia Mining Company was formally incorporated, and a man named Van Antwerp, with two hundred workmen and a half-dozen assistants, was sent South to lay out the freight railroad, … underbrush. It was not a task for a holiday, but a stern, difficult, and perplexing problem, and Van Antwerp was not quite the man to solve it. He was stubborn, self- confident, and indifferent by turns. He … which the Government had farmed out to the company to serve as laborers in the mines. Six months after Van Antwerp had taken charge at Valencia, Clay, who had finished the railroad in Mexico, of which King had spoken, … in fragments into tramp steamers would continue under his direction. He had a letter of recall for Van Antwerp, and a letter of introduction to the Minister of Mines and Agriculture. Further than that he knew … its usefulness on the Mississippi, and which had been rotting at the levees in New Orleans, when Van Antwerp had chartered it to carry tools and machinery to the mines and to serve as a private launch for himself. … climbing them on foot and skirting their base on horseback, and sleeping where night overtook him. Van Antwerp did not accompany him on his tour of inspection through the mines, but delegated that duty to an engineer … (source) mentioned in Soldiers of Fortune by Richard Harding Davis

    I had with me a young Dutch farmer–John Van Antwerp–and three Oneida Indians, who had apparently attached themselves to me on account of my epaulettes. … as he spoke. We were too late. They had fired on us from the cedars, and a bullet struck poor Van Antwerp down at my feet. (mention in In the Valley by Harold Frederic)

    of the gates of the fort, escorted by Company L, of the Eleventh Kansas, commanded by Lieutenant Van Antwerp. The company of one hundred mounted men acting as escort was too formidable a number for the Indians, … he thought at the time an excellent suggestion, in a few moments went over the creek to Lieutenant Van Antwerp‘s camp, to tell him that he need not wait for the wagon in the morning, but to start out early, at (from The old Santa Fe trail by Henry Inman)

    Schenectady, NY Van Antwerps Saturday, Oct 27 2007 

    Here are a few more notes on the Schenectady, NY Van Antwerps (which I believe were the first in the new world).  (source)

    Simon Danielse VAN ANTWERPEN [Parents] 1 was born in 1685 in Schenectady, Schenectady, New York. He died in 1747 in Schaghticoke, Rensselaer, New York. Simon married Maritje PEEK on 22 Dec 1706 in Albany, Albany Co., New York.

    Symon, second son of Daniel Janse and Maria (Groot) Van Antwerp, bought land and settled in Schagticoke, now Rensselaer County, NY in 1710. In 1718, the Commona1ty of Albany “…have granted to Simon Danielse (Van Antwerp) his heirs and Assigns forever a certain small creek on the south side of his land to build a grist mill thereon, provided he grinds no wheat for boulting, except ye same be boulted within the city of Albany, for which he is to pay yearly after January 1724, six skeple wheat yearly.” He married Maria, daughter of Jacobus Peek, in Albany on 22 December 1706. Their children were: Maria, who married Sysbert Van Brahelyn; Lysbet; Rebecca, who married Abraham De Forrest; Daniel; Sara May, who married Philip Winne; Daniel; Jacobus; Johannes; Lewis; Simon and Margaret.

    Maritje PEEK [Parents] 1 was born about 1682 in Schenectady, Albany Co., New York. She married Simon Danielse VAN ANTWERPEN on 22 Dec 1706 in Albany, Albany Co., New York.

    They had the following children:

      F i Maria Simon Danielse VAN ANTWERP

    Daniel Janse VAN ANTWERPEN [Parents] 1 was born in 1635 in Antwerp, Holland. He died after 1715 in of Schen, Schen, New York. Daniel married Maria or Marietje GROOT after 1669 in Schenectady, Albany, New York.

    Daniel Janse Van Antwerp was born in 1635. In 1660, he was deputy Schout fiscal at Fort Orange (Albany). In September 1661, he agreed with Adrian Appel, who was an innkeeper in New Amsterdam and trader in Albany, to serve him “in all matters and affairs that are just and right” for one year for thirty five beavers (or one hundred and twelve dollars) and all expenses. In 1662 he was deputy at Altoona on the Delaware River. He went to Schenectady very soon after its settlement, probably in l665. He had much dealing with the Indians, and settled eight miles beyond the village, but took precaution to build a stone-walled house on the bank of the Mohawk, in the center of his “Bouwery” where he and his friends were protected from hostile Indians, yet well in from the path of trade along the Mohawk. The house being close to its bank, the Mohawk River furnished a route for reaching Schenectady. This house now exists essentially as it was with little changes. The early surveys mark the house as Jan Danielse Van Antwerpens, and itineraries of the Mohawk Navigation Company show the adjacent shallow in the river as Van Antwerp’s Reef, where a struggle with the current was always expected. The Van Antwerp House, the oldest in New York State, is not now (in 1910) in possession of the family although negotiations are pending for its purchase. The village lot in Schenectady of Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen was on the east corner of Union and Church Streets, which was occupied by him prior to 1671, when a confirmatory grant was made to him by Governor Francis Lovelace. He owned this lot until 1715, when at the age of eighty years, he released it to the consistory of the Netherland Dutch Church. “…good causes and consideration him thereunto moving,” for the perpetual and sole use of the church. On 14 March 1909, a white marble tablet, suitably engraved to the memory of Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen, was presented to the First Reformed Church of Schenectady by Daniel Lewis Van Antwerp, of Troy, a descendant of the donor of the land on which the church is built. In 1680, land on the Third Plat was patented to him, one half of which he sold in 1706. In 1676, he was one of the five members of the Court of Justices of Schenectady, and in 1701 was Supervisor of the Township.
    Daniel Janse Van Antwerp married Maritje (Maria) Groot, daughter of Symon Symonse Groot and Rebecca Du Trieux. Her father, Symon Symonse Groot, came early to the New Netherlands in the service of the West India Company, as a boatswain on the Ship Prince Maurice. Maritje Groot’s mother, Rebecca Du Trieux (De Truax), was the daughter of Philip Du Trieux, court messenger of New Amsterdam. Their son, Simon, married Maria Peek, daughter of Jacobus Peek, whose father was Jan Peek, innkeeper of New Amsterdam, after whom the creek and town of Peekskill take their name. Children of Simon (Peek) Van Anterwpen: 1 – Maria, married Gysbert Gerritse Van Brockelin on 4 November 1707.; 2 – Lysbeth, born at Albany on 15 January 1710. Married Abraham De Forrest.; 3 – Rebecca, born 21 June 1712.; 4 – Daniel, born 10 January 1719. Married Rebecca, daughter of Jan Danielse Van Antwerpen on 21 October 1738. 7 – Margarita, baptized at Albany on 17 May 1721.8 – Jacobus, baptized at Albany on 22 January 1727. Married Catherine Vedder, daughter of Johanned Vedder, on 11 August 1750. 10 – Lowys (Lewis), baptized at Albany on 25 February 1731. Married Jendrijke Fonda Van Buren.
    In 1941, the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society published an article titled, The Family Van Antwerp In America, written by Lee Douglass Van Antwerp, A.B., M.D., of Undercliff, Meriden, CN. He presently resides in a North Shore Suburb of Chicago. This article was commenced in their January 1941, issue on page 18. Though the ancestral data is substantially the same as that already quoted above, we shall bring you some of the added information in this history.
    “Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen, the first of the name in America, and from whom nearly all of the name in America are descended, came to New Netherland probably a little before 1656. At this time he was about 21 years of age. The exact date of this young man’s arrival in America has not yet been found, perhaps never will be found. His name is not on any records of the immigrant passenger lists thus far to come to light, and nowhere in the records of his life which have been found is there any statement of where he came from in Holland or when he arrived in America; neither is there any hint as to his antecedents in Europe. It is possible that some of this information might have come to us if the French and Indians had not destroyed Schenectady, for tradition tells us that all his family records were lost in that terrible massacre on the night of February 8, 1690.
    The land on which he settled was, for the times, far in Indian country and was called the Woestyne, or Wilderness. It was located at a bend in the river, and had been a part of the Mohawk maize land probably for centuries. That he obtained this land not only demonstrates his native shrewdness, but the esteem in which the Indians must have held him. It is interesting to note, however, that he took the precaution to build a house of stone which doubtless served as a fort for himself and neighbors in many a skirmish.
    The old house is now known as the Jan Mebie House, and still stands near Rotterdam, NY. The identity of the Mebie House as the one built by Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen is just short of positive. In the opinion of authorities, the walls at least are those of the old Van Antwerp home, and it is very probable that when Daniel Janse sold the westerly half of the flat to Jan Pieterse Mebie in 1706, the house went with the land essentially as it stands today. It is thought to have been built between 1670 and 1680, and is a beautiful specimen of Dutch Colonial architecture. Near it is a small, windowless, stone-walled building which tradition tells us was used as a slave house, but which was more probably a storehouse. He was probably an elder of the Netherland Dutch Church in 1715 when he deeded his village lot to the church.
    By his marriage to Maria Groot he had five sons and three daughters. Maria was the daughter of Symon Symonse Groot and Rebecca Du Trieux. Du Thieus was a Walloon, was born in 1585 and was one of the earliest emigrants to New Netherland.”
    Dr. Van Antwerp probably obtained some of the data on the children from Professor Reynold’s work for he uses the same surname for Maria’s husband for he says on page 203 of the Record: “…Maria Van Antwerp, baptized 9 November 1707, in Schenectady, married 5 July 1730, Gysbert Van Brahelyn (Van Brakelen) who was baptized 28 October 1705, in Schenectady. Though he lists Jonathan Pearson’s Schenectady Families as his source, he did not find Pearson using this spelling, which brings us to the conclusion that he used for this part the information from Professor Reynolds, who it will be remembered from above said she married Sysbert Van Brahelyn.

    Maria or Marietje GROOT [Parents] 1 was born about 1635 in Schenectady, Schenectady, New York. She died after 1695. Maria married Daniel Janse VAN ANTWERPEN after 1669 in Schenectady, Albany, New York.

    They had the following children:

      M i Daniel Danielse VAN ANTWERPEN 1 was born about 1685 in Schenectady, Schenectady, New York. He died before 1747.
      F ii Neeltie VAN ANTWERPEN 1 was born in 1690 and was christened on 27 Jul 1690 in Albany, Albany, N.y.. She died after 1726.
      F iii Rebecca Danielse VAN ANTWERPEN 1 was born in 1692 in <, , New York> and was christened on 25 Dec 1692 in Albany, Albany, New York. She died after 1732.
      F iv Maritje VAN ANTWERPEN 1 was born in 1694 in and was christened on 3 Jan 1695 in Albany, Albany, New York. She died after 1734.
      M v Jan Danielse VAN ANTWERPEN 1 was born in 1675 in Schenectady, Schenectady, New York. He died on 26 Jan 1756 in Schenectady, New York and was buried in Jan 1756 in , , New York.
      M vi Arent Danielse VAN ANTWERPEN 1 was born about 1681/1686 in Schenectady, Schenectady, New York. He died on 26 Jan 1756.
      M vii Pieter VAN ANTWERPEN 1 was born about 1692 in Schenectady, Schenectady, New York. He died after 1742.
      M viii Simon Danielse VAN ANTWERPEN

    Time 1947 – Van Antwerp Mayor Saturday, Oct 6 2007 

    I found this old Time article about my grandfather being elected mayor.

    In Detroit, Mayor Edward J. Jeffries sought a fifth term with new backers. During three previous campaigns he had been bitterly opposed by the U.A.W.-C.I.O.; this time the union gave him its support.

    But Jeffries’ opponent, Councilman Eugene I. van Antwerp, complained loud & long about the price Mayor Jeffries had paid for his U.A.W. blessing. Some two months ago, he charged, Mayor Jeffries had obligingly looked the other way when U.A.W. used roughhouse tactics in an organization drive. Police sent to halt the riots said they had been told privately not to make arrests.

    Last week Detroit citizens voted Jeffries out and Van Antwerp in. The U.A.W. score: no runs, no hits, four errors.

    Van Antwerp Ancestry Page Saturday, Oct 6 2007 

    Here is a site with some early history about Van Antwerp’s…

    Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen, born in 1635, married Maria [Maritie] Groot, daughter of Simon Groot and Rebecca du Trieux. According to Pearson’s Genealogies of the First settlers of Schenectady, Daniel was in Beverwyck in 1661 when he “agreed to serve Adriaan Appel for one year, for 35 beavers (112 dollars) and found. Soon after Schenectady was settled, he became possessed of the Third flat on the south side if the Mohawk River, about 8 miles above Schenectady; in 1706 he sold the west half of his bouwery [to] his neighbor Jan Pieterse Mabie. His village lot was on the east side of Church street, next north of the present church lot… In 1676, he was one of five magistrates; in 1701 supervisor of the town.

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